SAGARPA (Agriculture, Stockbreeding, Rural Development, Fishing and Food Ministry)

Directory, location and schedules

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Terminal 1

  • Location:
    • Gate ”E1″, International Arrivals (Central and South America and the Caribbean), next to Baggage claim 12.
    • Gate ”E3″, International Arrivals (North America, Europe, Asia and África), in front of Baggage claim 22.
  • Public Service Window
    • Ambulatory hall at entrance 6
    • Service hours: 9:00 am to 8:00 pm, Monday to Sunday.
    • Telephone: 5905-1000, Ext.: 52170, 52171 and 52172.

Terminal 2

  • Location
    • Gate “E”, International Arrivals, in front of the Baggage Belts, office 71
  • Telephone: 2598-7157 and 7156
  • Timetable: 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Person in charge

Héctor López Dávalos
Head of  Agricultural Health Inspection Office of Terminals 1 and 2 at AICM.


Mission

To be the Federal Institution responsible for exercising its authority through the regulation, inspection, monitoring and certification of Agricultural, Aquatic and Fish Health, Safety and Quality, , to benefit  the value of food chains determined by SAGARPA.


Primary function of the Agricultural Health Inspection Office (OISA) at AICM.

As its name indicates, this office is responsible for inspecting products of plant, animal and aquatic origin, as well as the international transport of pets.  These inspection offices are located at every port, airport or border entry into Mexico.

When entering Mexico by plane or boat, you must fill out and submit your customs declaration. Read it carefully and answer it truthfully.  Remember that customs declaration are legal documents, and any false information can lead to retention and destruction of the product or to an administrative procedure involving fines.  Therefore, if you are bringing animals, food or products of animal, plant or aquatic origin, with you or in your baggage, you must declare them upon your entry into Mexican territory.  When declaring your items, they will be inspected by a phyto-zoo-sanitary security official, who will determine if the import is allowed, regulated or forbidden, in accordance with current regulations.

Note important: The information presented here must be read responsibly and consider the dynamics of pests and diseases of animals and plants in the world.  If you have any questions on the entry of goods regulated by SAGARPA, get in contact with the relevant offices.  Compliance with the requirements laid down by SAGARPA do not exempt you from the provisions of other entities.


Imports allowed for tourism

You can bring products for personal consumption without risking the introduction of pests or diseases, with prior visual inspection.  These products include:

  • Tobacco for smoking
  • Polished bone items
  • Cured and finished hides
  • Dried, cooked, packaged and bottled food (provided they are not from quarantined countries)
  • Dogs and cats (up to two) with a valid health certificate and vaccination record.
  • Processed products made from potato, turmeric, roasted coffee, prunes, bottled or packaged spices, dried medicinal herbs; canned, cooked or dried fruits and legumes; mushrooms, dried fruits, flours of or ground: corn, yuca, wheat, oatmeal, rye, soy and rice, when visual inspection does not detect pests.

Regulated imports

Products that may be brought into Mexico depending on the country of origin and the preparation process, provided they comply with phytozoosanitary or aquatic requirements established for their importation, include:

  • Birds and their products
  • Wildlife and hunting trophies

Note important: For hunting trophies, the importation procedure must be done through the Agricultural Health Inspection Office at the Customs Loading area.

  • Other pets (rabbits, ferrets, hamsters, etc.)
  • Un-tanned hides
  • Vegetable material (seeds, cuttings, etc.)
  • Fruits, vegetables, flowers, cereals, plants, etc.
  • Dairy products
  • Bees and their products (except honey)
  • Fresh, dried, canned, frozen meat and meat products (sausage, smoked, salted, matured, etc.) that do not come from countries with total quarantine
  • Vegetable-based or aquatic-based flours
  • Biological medicines

Forbidden Items

The following products may not be brought into Mexico for any reason, since they pose a high risk for introducing pests and diseases, such as:

  • Soil
  • Straw and packaging filled with hay and straw decorations
  • Homemade food products
  • Animal-based flours
  • Fresh, dried, canned, frozen meat and meat products (sausage, smoked, salted, matured, etc., or dairy products) that come from countries with total quarantine.

Impor of other specimens

General Directorate of Animal Health

If you wish to enter Mexico with species other than dogs and cats (pets), or any product of animal origin, you must go to the following address:

Location: Calle Municipio Libre No. 377, Col. Santa Cruz Atoyac, Del. Benito Juárez C.P. 03310, México, D.F.

Phone: +52 55  5905-1000, ext. 51037

General Directorate of Plant Health

If you wish to enter Mexico with any type of plant-based product, you must go to the following address:

Location: Calle Guillermo Pérez Valenzuela No. 127, Col. Del Carmen, Del. Coyoacán México, D.F.

Phone: +52 55  5905-1000, ext. 51345

General Directorate of Fish and Aquatic Regulations

If you wish to enter Mexico with any type of fish and/or aquatic product, you must go to the following address:

Location: Capitán de Navío CG. Virgilio Octavio Medina Mazatlán, Sinaloa.

Department: Imports and Exports.

Phone: 01 (669) 913-09-70 and 913-08-77

General Directorate of Phytozoosanitary Inspection

If you need information on the Inspection System at Ports, Airports and Border Areas, go to the following address:

Location: Calle Municipio Libre No. 377, Col. Santa Cruz Atoyac, Del. Benito Juárez C.P. 03310 México, D.F.

Phone: +52 55  5905-1000, ext. 51136 and 51127


Reasons for quarantine in Mexico 

Mexico has enormous agricultural and livestock potential, a great wealth of wild flora and fauna, and is free from many diseases and pests existing elsewhere in the world. Some diseases and plagues, such as bovine spongiform encelophalopathy (mad cow disease), hoof and mouth disease, the New World screw-worm fly, akabane, bovine leukemia virus, rabbit haemorrhagic disease, African swine fever, khapra beetles, Oriental fruit moth, pink hibiscus mealybug, and yellowhead disease of shrimp and prawn have been kept out of Mexico.

Recommendations

  • If you are visiting Mexico — whether on vacation, for business or to set up residence — we would appreciate that you learn about our Agricultural Health and Quarantine Legislation, which establishes the products that can be brought into Mexico.
  • If you are visiting friends and family, you can bring gifts, but be informed beforehand on the agricultural- and aquatic-based products that you can bring into Mexico. If you are unaware of quarantine limitations you could inadvertently introduce a pest or exotic disease, which would put livestock and agriculture at risk, as well as Mexico’s wild flora and fauna.

For more information

If you have questions on Agricultural or Aquatic Health Laws, ask to speak to a phyto-zoo-sanitary security official when you arrive to Mexico and after claiming your baggage. You can also send your questions to:

st.dgi@senasica.sagarpa.gob.mx

eids.dgi@senasica.sagarpa.gob.mx

You can also check on the following website SAGARPA Adds-Add-link-icon2
Note important: The information presented here must be read responsibly and consider the dynamics of pests and diseases of animals and plants in the world.  If you have any questions on the entry of goods regulated by SAGARPA, get in contact with the relevant offices.  Compliance with the requirements laid down by SAGARPA do not exempt you from the provisions of other entities.


img_senasicaSENASICA (National Service for Health, Safety and Agrifood Quality, Office of Agricultural Health Inspection)

Mission

To be the federal institution responsible for exercising its authority through the regulation, inspection, monitoring and certification of Agricultural, Aquatic and Fish Health, Safety and Quality, in benefit of the value of food chains determined by SAGARPA.

International transport of agricultural products

One of the duties of SENASICA, through the General Directorate of Phyto-zoo-sanitary Inspection (DGIF) at Mexico’s points of entry is to inspect baggage and plant/animal-based products carried by tourists or travelers.  These revisions, which are part of the international quarantine control system, have helped intercept different pests and diseases, which when introduced into Mexico would have had severe impacts on national agricultural production.

For example: Mexico City’s International Airport, with the highest traffic of passengers from all over the world, and therefore many imports from tourists, has intercepted pests such as: Fusarium sp.  Colletotrichum sp., and Altemaria sp., in bananas from the United States; the khapra beetle (Trogoderma granarium) in stored grains from India and fruit flies (Anastrepha ludens) in fresh fruit from Costa Rica.

For more information

To learn more about animal and plant based products that can be brought to Mexico, based on the type of permitted tourism importation (regulated and forbidden), check the following tab:



Live animals, vegetables, products and by products that may be imported in baggage and vehicles.
Imports Permitted as Tourism

You can bring products for personal consumption or use an existing risk for the introduction of pests or diseases, with prior visual inspection, such as:

Tobacco for smoking, polished bone items, tanned and finished hides, dried, cooked, packaged and bottled foods (provided they are not from quarantined countries).  Roasted coffee, prunes, bottled or packaged spices, dried medicinal herbs, canned, cooked or dried fruits and legumes.

From the United States with a USDA seal: refrigerated, frozen, vacuum canned, cooked and processed pork, sterile canned pork pate; fresh, frozen, cooked or processed poultry meat, provided they are not from quarantined states due to bird flu (Connecticut, Pennsylvania, California, Texas, Delaware, New Jersey, Maryland and Saint Louis, Missouri) *health status updated as of December 2004.  Milk, dairy and cheese; all these products with their original packaging and labels.

From Canada: pork and poultry — refrigerated, frozen, vacuum canned, cooked and processed, sterile canned pate; milk, dairy and cheeses; all these products must be in their original packaging and labels, including the agriculture department or ministry seal of the country of origin.

Regulated tourist imports (requires compliance with certain requirements).

The following plant- or animal-based products may be brought into Mexico depending on the country of origin and/or source, the animal species and preparation process, to which they have been subjected to, provided they comply with phyto-zoo-sanitary and zoo-sanitary requirements established for their import:

Live animals (ornamental and songbirds, rabbits and other small species), eggs, unfinished or un-tanned hides, head trophies, plant materials (seeds, cuttings, etc.)  fruits, vegetables, flowers, cereals, plants, etc. Dairy products, bees and their products (except honey), fresh, dried, canned or frozen meat and meat products (sausage, smoked, salted, matured, etc.) that do not come from countries with total quarantine.  Biological medicines and products for veterinary use, lobsters, shrimp, crabs, brine shrimp, flour and crustacean pellets (not from a source in accordance with Bulletin 420 of Aug. 25, 2004).  Living genetically modified organisms, items that have traces of organic products (soil or blood), such as boots, bullfighter dress, spears, rocks, etc.

Forbidden products

The following products may not be brought into Mexico for any reason, since they pose a high risk of introducing pests and diseases, such as:

Soil, straw, packaging filled with hay and straw decorations Homemade food products.  Animal-based flours. Fresh, dried, canned, frozen meat and meat products (sausage, smoked, salted, matured, etc.) that come from quarantined countries or do not have their original packaging and labels, perfectly identifying the animal species, country of origin and/or source.  Vaccinations or biological agents that contain any component of exotic diseases or pests, published in the “Agreement listing exotic and enzootic diseases and pests of mandatory notification in the United Mexican States”, published on March 5, 1999.


Transport of dogs and cats

Requirements for entering or exiting Mexico

Health Certificate: An original and copy, issued and signed by an official veterinary doctor from the competent authority, or by a private veterinary doctor from the country of origin on letterhead, with the professional license number printed or a photocopy of it (or its equivalent), at the Office of Agricultural Health Inspection, where you enter Mexico, which indicates:

    1. Name and address of the exporter and importer.
    2. Animals under 3 months of age that have been immunized against rabies and show their vaccination application date and duration are exempt from this requirement.
    3. Proof that during inspection prior to export, the animals were clinically healthy.

If your pet is Mexican and is coming from the US or Canada, you may provide the health certificate issued to you by the private veterinary doctor prior to your exit from Mexico, provided that it has the rabies vaccination and has not been issued six months before, or provide the vaccination record with the current rabies vaccination.

If your pet originates or is coming from any other part of the world

Before completing the above requirements (1, 2 and 3), the health certificate that you provide must state:

  1. That the animals have been subject to a preventive treatment against internal and external parasites, within 6 months prior to their transportation, and that they are free from ectoparasites.
  2.  Animals originating from Mexico are exempt from submitting a health certificate if a Zoo-sanitary Certificate for Mexican Exportation was issued for the pet’s export within 6 months.
  3. The Official Mexican Veterinary Doctor will inspect your pet’s documents and perform a detailed physical inspection.  If the inspection reveals the presence of ectoparasites, a private veterinary doctor of the importer’s choice must provide relevant treatment; once the treatment is provided, the animal may be admitted.
  4. If your pet has skin infections such as scabies, dermatomycosis, dermatophytosis, alopecia, or similar, the animal will not be allowed in the country.
  5. The Official Mexican Veterinary Doctor will spray a disinfectant on the transporters or the animals, both which must be clean.
  6. Beds or similar items accompanying animals will not be admitted.  Only bring enough food for your pet’s travel and first day. Any excess food will not be admitted.
  7. When the Health Certificate does not specify a rabies vaccination, the pet’s vaccination record or documents (original and copy) will be accepted. These must include the vaccination date, the type of vaccine used, its duration, and the validity of the application date.  The Official Mexican Veterinary will keep only the copy after comparing it to the original document.
  8. Health Certificates issued by a private veterinary doctor must be on letterhead paper, with the doctor’s professional license number printed or a photocopy of it (or its equivalent abroad).  If health certificates on official forms are submitted, these must be duly signed and sealed by official personnel from the country of origin or source.

Note important: If you are transporting 1 or 2 pets, the procedure is free. From 3 on, the procedure has a cost. Please submit the original and copy of all documents. For information on traveling with your pet, we suggest you contact the consular embassy in Mexico or abroad for additional requirements of each country. 


More information

We suggest you visit the following website SENASICA  Adds-Add-link-icon2

Revised/Last Update: November 20, 2013 4:25 pm